The Law. Steeped in Tradition.

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The legal industry is steeped in tradition. Yet that doesn't have to preclude it from being innovative. In fact, according to the 2016 Best Legal Adviser Report, 62% of law firms say innovation is important to their business.

Legal firms who have embraced innovation know the value of asking the right questions:

Innovation is about constant improvement. How can we do better for our clients? How can we run our team better? How can we deliver legal advice better? We are exploring new technologies by looking at the whole smarter working space, for example onshoring and deconstruction. In a changing and challenging legal market it is important we constantly strive to creatively improve the way we deliver our legal services and ensure they are truly aligned with our clients’ needs.
— Nigel Emmerson, Partner and Head of Innovation, Bond Dickinson

So, how are legal firms using new technologies to help them innovate?

Our client, CMS- Legal, a global firm, has been using OrganisedFeedback's idea management tools to engage with their employees.

They began by challenging them to focus on 3 areas: how they could improve service to clients; how they could improve their internal processes; and how to increase the 'quality of life' and value felt by employees.

The last challenge is interesting. Innovation and continuous improvement is meant to make people happier -  at work and after work too. So how might that be achieved?

In our experience (as human beings, not just innovation gurus), the most significant driver of satisfaction and happiness at work is knowing that it is possible to influence the way it is done; in other words to have some control over potential improvement in process and outcome. To be powerless is to be - at the very least - disengaged. 

To be empowered in this way implies that permission to suggest improvement, to suggest change, does not need to be sought; it needs to be "the way we do things around here".  

OrganisedFeedback through its processes and rationale makes a dramatic and practical contribution to this culture change.

Three principles and one observation

  1. A Culture of Improvement evolves when everyone believes they have “permission” to explore and suggest change. Make sure employees know that change is normal and expected.
     
  2. Reward those who identify and share problems because that prompts new ideas. Encourage thinking to describe, measure and analyse the improvement opportunity.
     
  3. Think about work as a process. Best to think about the job we do as a series of steps where each makes a contribution to the next stage. When we do that, the chances are that we will spot where time, effort and resources are badly used. And before you know it, there will be the beginning of an improvement idea we can learn about and comment on in OrganisedFeedback.
The Iceberg of Ignorance exists. In his acclaimed study “The Iceberg of Ignorance”, consultant Sidney Yoshida concluded: “Only 4% of an organization’s front line problems are known by top management, 9% are known by middle management, 74% by supervisors and 100% by employees…”

The Iceberg of Ignorance exists. In his acclaimed study “The Iceberg of Ignorance”, consultant Sidney Yoshida concluded: “Only 4% of an organization’s front line problems are known by top management, 9% are known by middle management, 74% by supervisors and 100% by employees…”

New Features and Updates

  • BI Tool Integration
  • Responsive Design
  • Dashboard (in admin) per community
  • Prompting users who have not responded to a private challenge
  • @mention feature - ability to mention colleagues in comments discussion
  • Filtered communities per assigned users
  • Forgot password feature only requires email address
  • Displaying a message that a report is being generated
  • Improved status display
  • Improved voting buttons
  • Improved alert format
  • Displaying the "Search" on right side bar
  • Conversation Types (Ideas, problems, praise, opportunities)
  • Ability to disable negative rating of comments

Small things matter!

Case Study and Briefing Paper: The Principles and Practice of Continuous Improvement through Employee generated Idea.

Glasgow City Council, like all public sector organisations, has been pursuing efficiency and effectiveness gains as part of their Transformation agenda. And, like many organisations, as part of this agenda Glasgow City Council has also fully embraced systematic thinking including Lean thinking and training therein.

It is the combination of technology and effective team based organisational structure, along with the processes in Employee Voice, that delivers successful outcomes and makes a dramatic contribution to transformation.

Download the briefing paper here