Three principles and one observation

  1. A Culture of Improvement evolves when everyone believes they have “permission” to explore and suggest change. Make sure employees know that change is normal and expected.
     
  2. Reward those who identify and share problems because that prompts new ideas. Encourage thinking to describe, measure and analyse the improvement opportunity.
     
  3. Think about work as a process. Best to think about the job we do as a series of steps where each makes a contribution to the next stage. When we do that, the chances are that we will spot where time, effort and resources are badly used. And before you know it, there will be the beginning of an improvement idea we can learn about and comment on in OrganisedFeedback.
The Iceberg of Ignorance exists. In his acclaimed study “The Iceberg of Ignorance”, consultant Sidney Yoshida concluded: “Only 4% of an organization’s front line problems are known by top management, 9% are known by middle management, 74% by supervisors and 100% by employees…”

The Iceberg of Ignorance exists. In his acclaimed study “The Iceberg of Ignorance”, consultant Sidney Yoshida concluded: “Only 4% of an organization’s front line problems are known by top management, 9% are known by middle management, 74% by supervisors and 100% by employees…”